The Differences in the Top Eleven Osprey Daypacks — And How to Choose the Perfect Daytime Backpack

Read More

How I Set Up a Dual-Screen Standing Desk That’s Actually Portable

Read More

The Kindle as a Powerhouse for Language Learning: Hacks and Review

Read More

Minimalist Packing List: How to Travel the Globe for Decades with Only a Carry-On

Read More

The Best Gift Ideas for Language Learning: Spanish, French, Chinese, and Anything Else

Read More

Backpacking & Hostels Make for Awful, Boring Travel — And Aren’t Always Cheapest Either

Read More

The Essential Travel Trade-Off: Less Luggage = More & Greater Adventures

Read More

When hungover, Germans speak of howling cats while Icelanders’ phrase literally means to have the God of Thunder’s hammers in your brain. Iberian languages refer to the undertow; apparently the land’s regurgitation of water to the sea is evocative. Latin Americans show a great linguistic range in their post-bacchanal gloom, using Spanish or native words for …

You’ve had enough. You’re ready to escape a gathering, but, in many countries, manners dictate going around the table to kiss everyone goodbye. With a certain type of folks and level of chaos and inebriation, these goodbyes can take ages. The Germans have a much less kissy-kissy culture than many of their European counterparts, so …

Ah, the Catalans and their toasts. Ready? Lift your glass and bellow the following: Sant Hilari, sant Hilari, fill de puta, qui no se l’acabi! — Saint Hilari, Saint Hilari, oh he’s a son of a whore, he who won’t finish up! There’s no particular reason to call on poor Saint Hilari to make everyone guzzle …

Using a pickup line in your native tongue is a dubious move. But in a foreign language the mispronounced equivalent of “Do you come here often?” can be funny, even endearing. The following are very clichéd classics; say them earnestly, falteringly, and for once your bewildered foreigner status may work in your favor. T’as des …