Important Phrases for Boinking Your Lover(s) in Mexican Spanish

How to navigate lovemaking, sex parties, consent, hooking up, gossip, and more using Mexican slang

Mexican Spanish is unique, and this is especially true when you’re making love — you’re likely to hear phrases that differ those heard in your love piles in other Spanish-speaking countries.

As in many cultures, sex is considered a bit “naughty” in Mexico, but with consternation and intrigue comes linguistic creativity. There’s a rich range of slang associated with sex acts in Mexican Spanish that you won’t find in the dry, official version of the language.

The RAE, or “official” Spanish dictionary, for example, does not offer the sexualized Mexican definition of cogedera (they use a masculine version, and just call it a handle), but don’t worry, I’ve got that and lots more covered below.

Update History of This Article

This article was first published on February 21, 2020.

Why You Need to Learn to Babble About Sex in Mexican Spanish

Do you really need to use Mexican phrases when you’re boning? Isn’t the language of love universal? Doesn’t a smoldering look say everything? No, no, it doesn’t, and yes, yes you should learn Mexican sex phrases, because:

  • Verbal communication is important for navigating consent, both for expressing desire for your favorite sex acts and for stating your no-goes.
  • Your silly foreign accent when speaking Mexican Spanish will be perceived as seductive, hilarious, and/or sweet, both in and out of bed. We’ve noted how this is useful for seduction in French and Catalan. And you should learn a few ridiculous words to screw around and not communicate in any language when you travel.
  • Phrases for boning are generally not covered in otherwise good textbooks and language classes, even though they’re really the most interesting and useful thing, and boinking is one great way to start to understand any culture.
  • Such vocabulary is also useful for understanding and functioning in other daily situations, aside from when you are smashing nethers.

Mexican Spanish Sex Phrasebook

Here’s what my extensive research has shown that you need to know when doing hot love jumbles with your most very special Mexicans.

I’ve focused on typically Mexican terms that you might throw you for a loop if you learned Spanish elsewhere. This list is focused on the slang necessary for understanding and participating in lovemaking, but much of it can be used in daily life as well.

Phrases for Expressing Pleasure in a Mexican Orgy/Trio/Duo

  • Está muy chingón. — It is fucking amazing.
  • Qué chingón. — It’s amazing.
  • No mames. — Wow! No way! No kidding! (The verb mamar literally means to breastfeed, but in the negative imperative like this it’s an interjection for expressing surprise, disbelief, and amazement.)
  • Estuvo mamón. — It was amazing. (As a noun, mamón, can mean a pompous ass, or more literally a baby who has not yet been weaned.)
  • ¡Me la estoy pasando a toda madre! — Amazing! (“I’m living it to every mother”; this can be disconcerting for the non-Mexicans in the room to hear during sex.)
  • Está de poca madre. / Está padre. / Está chido. — It’s cool or great.
  • Estoy cachondo/cachonda. — I’m turned on. (said by a male/female).

The Sexy Mexican Body Parts

  • chichis — boobs (Be aware that in Spain this means “cunt”.)
  • teclas, lolas — boobs (more slangy, lower-class term)
  • cola, nachas, ignacias — ass, buttocks
  • el pito — the dick (literally a whistle or horn)
  • lo — it
  • el chile — the penis
  • encuerado / encuerada — naked (male / female)

When discussing the penis during sex in Mexico, you’re likely to hear lo in phrases like métemelo (put it in me), whereas in Spain the much more frequent form of “it” during banging is la as in métemela. The Mexican Spanish speaker desiring dick is likely thinking of lo as in el pito whereas the Spaniard likely thinks of la as in la polla. But la is also possible in Mexico, referring to la verga:

  • la verga —the dick
  • la panocha, la pucha — the vagina
  • pendejo — literally, pubic hair (though it’s more often used to refer to a jerk or a fool)

Take a Class in Mexican Slang

You’re reading what we think is the most accurate collection of current Mexican slang (and translations) on the internet. But if you want to be able to actually remember it, pronounce it correctly and use it in context, we suggest practice through online video classes.

Here’s how to become flawless:

1. Sign up for an online class. My personal favorite platform for this is Italki, where Mexican Spanish teachers typically charge $5-10 per hour.

2. Be sure to choose a native speaker from Mexico (in the drop down filters) and, if you wish, search for mentions of “slang” specifically in the profile. (Italki still had around a dozen teachers with these filters applied, at last check.)

3. Explain to your teacher exactly what your goals are (e.g., not academic, but rather communicative and informal).

4. I generally sign up with classes with more than one teacher from the same country to compare versions—slang usage can vary a lot from person to person as it is not standardized.

  • ¡Qué sí güey! — OK, cool, dude. (This is an interjection to show that what the other person says is interesting, you’re on board, and you’re totally listening.)
  • ¡Va! — OK! / Yes! (An expression of agreement, literally means “it goes”.)
  • ¡Órale! — Wow! You bet! Yes! Interesting!
  • ¡A huevo! — Hell yes! Absolutely!
  • Gracias. — Often used to mean “no”, as a shorthand for “no thank you”. For example, if you ask someone if it’s OK to stick a thing in another thing and they say “gracias” it more likely means “no thanks” rather than the “yes please and thanks” that you might imagine.)
  • Maso. — Sort of. (Short for mas o menos, “more or less”.)
  • Ahorita. — Soon. / In a moment. / When I get around to it. / Never. (See this in-depth explanation of the Mexican use of ahorita in Spanish.)
  • Me sacas de onda. — You’re killing the vibe/taking me out of it/surprising me.
  • Me da hueva. — It bores me. / I’m too lazy right now to do that.
  • ¡Guácala! / ¡Fuchi! — Ewwww!
  • ¡Cójanme! / ¡Cógeme! — Fuck me! (The first phrase is the plural command, for demanding fucking from more than one Mexican. The second is singular, for use if you want just one Mexican, or one at a time.)
  • ¡Aguas! — Watch out! (An expression said to come from what people used to shout as they would throw waste water out onto the streets from their windows; now generally used as a warning for anything, like if one of your lovers is about to fall off the bed.)

Vulgar/Jokey/Stupid Mexican Pickup Lines

All of the following are ways to propose sex, but generally jokingly.

Mexico is a rather religious and conservative country, so as is typical for such lands, there is far more joking about sex than actual fucking. So this list could be (annoyingly) endless. I’ll leave it to just a few choice phrases.

  • Vamos a rellenar el bolillo. — Let’s fill the roll (pastry/vagina).
  • Vamos a despeinar la cotorra. — Let’s pluck the parrot.
  • Hoy cena pancho. — Today, hot dog (dick) is for dinner.
  • Hay que ponerle Jorge al niño. — It’s necessary to give Jorge a child.
  • Hay que peinar a la cotorra. — It’s necessary to comb the cunt.
  • Hay que hacer hijos para la guerra. — It’s necessary to make babies for the war.
  • Vamos a echarnos un brinco / un caldo / un palito. — Let’s take a jump / a soup broth / a little stick.
  • Vamos a echar pasión / pata. — Let’s throw passion / a paw.
  • Hay que matar el oso a puñaladas. — It’s necessary to kill the bear (pound the cunt) by stabbing.

Gossip About Mexican Sex After the Act

Here are a variety of terms in Mexican Spanish that can be useful for describing the people you’re sleeping with, where you met them, and what you’re doing with them.

  • godín / godinez— an office drone (insulting; a storied term)
  • fresa — preppy, stuck up
  • naco — cheesy, tacky; a peasant
  • chilango — person from Mexico City
  • pendejita — a bit stupid
  • comejabones — “eats soap”; a young hipster “entrepreneur” with a ridiculous business plan like making her own soap, but who actually lives off her parents
  • chacal — tanned, muscled working man
  • antro — nightclub
  • tianguis — informal street market
  • revolcadero — hideaway fuck spot
  • chela / cheve — beer
  • crudo / cruda — hung over
  • mi vieja / mi viejo — my girlfriend / my boyfriend (literally, old woman / old man)
  • encimoso / encimosa — clingy, extremely affectionate (an adorable term for a lover who always seems to be all over you, from encima, or on top)
  • Él coge muy rico. — He fucks very well.
  • Habla su caló. — He/she speaks his/her low-class/gipsy dialect.
  • la cogedera — the fuck pile
  • ¿Neta? — You don’t say! Really?
  • Se hizo una chaqueta. — He was jerking off.
  • ligar — to flirt, to pick up someone
  • fajar — to feel up, touch sexually
  • apapachar — to cuddle, pamper, hug
  • revolcarse — to screw, have a roll in the hay

“¿Y ustedes, qué son?” — Discussing relationship statuses

Note that serial monogamy is the social, outward-facing norm in Mexico. Romance often implies exclusive access to a single partner’s genitals, and such exclusivity implies romance.

There is also of course a lot of cheating. (Motels are quite common and facilitate that, but are also used by established couples as a romantic adventure.) Polyamory is uncommon, and there is some homophobia.

  • ¿Y ustedes, qué son? — And what are you? (Refers to relationship status.)
  • ¿Y tú y yo, qué somos? — And you and I, what are we?
  • Es mi free. — This is my fuck buddy.
  • Es mi faje. — This is my makeout buddy.
  • Es mi amigo con derechos. — He’s my friend with benefits.
  • amiguito / amiguita — a bit more than a friend
  • cuate / compa / carnal — friend
  • Es mi no novio. — He’s my not-boyfriend. (That is, the relationship is sexual and does not include a romantic/emotional component.)
  • prometido / prometida — fiancé / fiancée
  • novio / novia — boyfriend / girlfriend, usually sexually exclusive
  • amante — lover (implies a stable, ongoing infidelity)
  • mi crush — a crush, especially one who does not return your affections
  • mi pompi / mi nalguita — fuck buddy
  • follo, matón — fuck buddy (male)
  • funda — fuck buddy (female)

Your Sexy Input

Have I missed a few things? Of course! Feel free to add them in the comments (I’ll update this article when warranted), but note what we’re looking for:

  • Mexican Spanish
  • Useful for sex acts
  • I’m not particularly interested in degrading/sexist jokes and such.

Thanks, and may your Mexican love adventures be wet and dreamy, guey!

ADDENDUM: One astute, sexy reader wrote in to suggest lucha libre masks like these for Mexican orgies, or really, orgies anywhere. Now, I happen to like faces, and have fortunately myself never seen masks worn at any Mexican orgy, but I can understand the appeal nonetheless.

Artwork by the incredible Johanna Thomé de Souza. Thanks also to my Mexican love advisors and terminologists.


Continue Learning Real Mexican Spanish

The main block to Spanish learning is generally motivation, and we hope that these juicy phrases have given you a good kick in the pants to go further. We’ve written extensively on the science of language learning and what hacks work best. But to put it briefly, if you want to keep improving Spanish, stop screwing around with silly phone apps and take a moment right now to make a real commitment.

  1. Sign up for (super-cheap, efficient, one-on-one) online classses with native speakers. By far our favorite platform for this is Italki, and you can find specifically Mexican native-speaking Spanish teachers at this link. Mexican teachers’ rates are around $10 an hour or even less, and trial classes are much less. Sign up for at least two classes with two different teachers; it’s vital to get different perspectives. Tell them what you want to work on and are interested. If you don’t click or they speak a lot of English with you, switch. When you find teachers you like, set up regular lessons.
  2. Get a self-teaching guidebook or textbook. If you love learning this way, use it from cover to cover. If you don’t, that’s fine; just keep it on hand to refer to when grammar issues bug you and you want a clear explanation to come back to. For beginners to intermediate learners I’d recommend a guide that focuses on a lot of basic real-world contexts, like Complete Spanish, and for intermediate to advanced learners get the more grammar-focused Complete Spanish Step-by-Step (the two books are unrelated, just similarly titled and both excellent).
  3. Start living in the language. Make Spanish-speaking friends who don’t speak English, or who will tolerate your level of Spanish as you learn. Read in Spanish (and check out our guide to using the instant dictionary lookup and audio capabilities of Kindle). Listen to Spanish-language podcasts and music and watch Spanish series and movies.

Want more? I have a fuller explanation of my path as an adult with a crappy memory to full fluency in lots of languages, as well as my minimalist’s approach to speaking those other languages I don’t speak, without communication, while having shit-tons of fun.

2 Comments

  1. Avatar
    Sarah
    2020-06-01
    Reply

    My (Mexican) ex boyfriend taught me “quiero cojerte” and that’s about the extent of my Spanish!

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